Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

Protection (1) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

monk-pro-1
$24.94
Blessed by Japanese monks



Blessed omamori PROTECTION to put in your wallet

 

Omamori PROTECTION (bad luck, negative energy, evil eye, curses, demons, etc.) for wallet

*****

IMAGE: V sign

The V sign, primarily palm-outward, is very commonly made by Japanese people, especially younger people, when posing for informal photographs, and is known as pīsu sain (ピースサイン, peace sign), or more commonly simply pīsu (ピース, peace). As the name reflects, this dates to the Vietnam War era and anti-war activists, though the precise origin is disputed. The V sign was known in Japan from the post-World War II Allied occupation of Japan, but did not acquire the use in photographs until later.

In Japan, it is generally believed to have been influenced by Beheiren's anti-Vietnam War activists in the late 1960s and a Konica camera advertisement in 1971. A more colorful account of this practice claims it was influenced by the American figure skater Janet Lynn during the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Hokkaidō. She fell during a free-skate period, but continued to smile even as she sat on the ice. Though she placed third in the competition, her cheerful diligence and persistence resonated with many Japanese viewers. Lynn became an overnight foreign celebrity in Japan. A peace activist, Lynn frequently flashed the V sign when she was covered in Japanese media, and she is credited by some Japanese for having popularized its use since the 1970s in amateur photographs.

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