School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

School (24) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

monk-sch-24
$24.94
Blessed by Japanese monks



Blessed omamori SCHOOL to put in your wallet

 

Omamori SCHOOL (for students, school/entrance exams, etc.) for wallet

*****

IMAGE: Tō-ji (drawing by Fujishima Takeji, 1867-1943)

Tō-ji (東寺) is a Shingon Buddhist temple in the Minami-ku ward of Kyoto, Japan.

Founded in 796, it was one of the only three Buddhist temples allowed in the city at the time it became the capital of Japan. As such it has a long history, housing treasures and documents from the early Heian period and the Tang dynasty, and with buildings in its complex covering the Kamakura, Muromachi, Momoyama, and Edo periods. Five of these buildings have been designated National Treasures in two different categories: the Lotus Flower Gate (rengemon), the Miei Hall (mieidō), the Golden Hall (kondō) and the five-storied Pagoda (gojūnotō) (temple buildings) and the Kanchiin Guest Hall (kanchiin kyakuden) (residences).

Tō-ji was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994, as part of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto.

Tō-ji was founded in the early Heian period. The temple dates from 796, two years after the capital moved to Heian-kyō. Together with its partner Sai-ji, and the temple Shingon-in (located in the Heian Palace), it was one of only three Buddhist temples allowed in the capital at the time, and is the only of the three to survive to the present.

It once had a partner, Sai-ji (West Temple) and, together, they stood alongside the Rashomon, gate to the Heian capital. It was formerly known as Kyō-ō-gokoku-ji, The Temple for the Defense of the Nation by Means of the King of Doctrines) which indicates that it previously functioned as a temple providing protection for the nation. Tō-ji is located in Minami-ku near the intersection of Ōmiya Street and Kujō Street, southwest of Kyōto Station.

Tō-ji is often associated with Kōbō Daishi (Kūkai). Though Tō-ji began to decline in the end of Heian period, it came back into the spotlight with the rise of Daishi Shinko (worshipping of Kōbō Daishi) in the Kamakura period. The well-known Buddhist priest was put in charge of Tō-ji in 823 by order of Emperor Saga. The temple's principal image is of Yakushi Nyorai, the Medicine Buddha. Many religious services for Daishi are held in Miei-dō, the residence of Kōbō Daishi.

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