School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

School (15) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

monk-sch-15
$24.99
Blessed by Japanese monks



Blessed omamori SCHOOL to put in your wallet

 

Omamori SCHOOL (for students, school/entrance exams, etc.) for wallet

*****

IMAGE: Jundei Kannon (Cundī) 

Cundī (japanese Jundei Kannon 准胝仏母) is a bodhisattva and an incarnation of the Cundī Dhāraṇī.

Cundī appears with eighteen arms on a lotus flower and is sometimes referred to as the "Goddess of the Seventy Million.

In late imperial China, early traditions of Tangmi were still thriving in Buddhist communities. Robert Gimello has also observed that in these communities, the esoteric practices of Cundī were extremely popular among both the populace and the elite.

The first textual source of Cundī and the Cundī Dhāraṇī is the Kāraṇḍavyūhasūtra, a sūtra centered around the bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara that introduced the popular mantra oṃ maṇipadme hūṃ. This text is first dated to around the late 4th century CE to the early 5th century CE. Cundī and the Cundī Dhāraṇī are also featured in the Cundī Dhāraṇī Sūtra, which was translated three times from Sanskrit into Chinese in the late 7th century and early 8th century by the Indian esoteric masters Divākara (685 CE), Vajrabodhi (723 CE), and Amoghavajra (8th century).

Cundī is depicted with eighteen arms, each wielding implements that symbolize upaya. Her eighteen arms also represent the eighteen merits of attaining Buddhahood as described in an appendix to the Cundī Dhāraṇī Sūtra.

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