Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet
Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

Health (16) * Omamori blessed by monks, Kyoto * For wallet

monk-hea-16
$24.99
Blessed by Japanese monks



Blessed omamori HEALTH to put in your wallet

 

Omamori HEALTH (diseases, pregnancy, etc.) for wallet

*****

IMAGE: Jizō Bosatsu (Kṣitigarbha)

Kṣitigarbha, Jizō Bosatsu in japanese (地藏菩萨), is a bodhisattva primarily revered in East Asian Buddhism and usually depicted as a Buddhist monk. His name may be translated as "Earth Treasury", "Earth Store", "Earth Matrix", or "Earth Womb". Kṣitigarbha is known for his vow to take responsibility for the instruction of all beings in the six worlds between the death of Gautama Buddha and the rise of Maitreya, as well as his vow not to achieve Buddhahood until all hells are emptied. He is therefore often regarded as the bodhisattva of hell-beings, as well as the guardian of children and patron deity of deceased children and aborted fetuses in Japanese culture, where he is known as Jizō or Ojizō-sama.

Usually depicted as a monk with a halo around his shaved head, he carries a staff to force open the gates of hell and a wish-fulfilling jewel to light up the darkness.

Kṣitigarbha is one of the four principal bodhisattvas in East Asian Mahayana Buddhism. The others are Samantabhadra, Manjusri, and Avalokiteśvara.

At the pre-Tang dynasty grottos in Dunhuang and Longmen, he is depicted in a classical bodhisattva form. After the Tang, he became increasingly depicted as a monk carrying Buddhist prayer beads and a staff.

His full name in Chinese is Dayuan Dizang Pusa, or "Bodhisattva King Kṣitigarbha of the Great Vow," pronounced Daigan Jizō Bosatsu in Japanese and Jijang Bosal in Korean. This name is a reference to his pledge, as recorded in the sutras, to take responsibility for the instruction of all beings in the six worlds in the era between the parinirvana of the Buddha and the rise of Maitreya. Because of this important role, shrines to Kṣitigarbha often occupy a central role in temples, especially within the memorial halls or mausoleums.

The story of Kṣitigarbha was first described in the Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva Pūrvapraṇidhāna Sūtra, one of the most popular Mahayana sutras. This sutra is said to have been spoken by the Buddha towards the end of his life to the beings of the Trāyastriṃśa Heaven as a mark of gratitude and remembrance for his beloved mother, Maya. The Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva Pūrvapraṇidhāna Sūtra begins, "Thus have I heard. Once the Buddha was abiding in Trayastrimsas Heaven in order to expound the Dharma to his mother".

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